advertisement
 

  Back to Friends for Life Seattle 2019 Friends for Life Seattle 2019 Faculty

 

Bruce Buckingham, MD, is a Professor in the Department of Pediatric Endocrinology at Stanford Medical Center and Stanford Children's Hospital. His research focuses on continuous glucose monitoring in children and closed-loop (artificial pancreas) systems. He has been active as the principal investigator at Stanford in multiple NIH, JDRF and Helmsley sponsored research studies. He is currently doing multicenter closed-loop studies with Medtronic Diabetes, Type Zero, the University of Virginia, Insulet, Bionic Pancreas, Bigfoot Biomedical, Tandem, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, and Cambridge. His other interests include algorithms for detecting infusion set and sensor failures and to improve infusion set wear duration.



 

Leigh Davis Fickling, MEd, MS, JD, is the Executive Director of the Disability Management System at Duke University. With over 19 years of experience in Higher Education Administration, Leigh has served in a variety of executive leadership roles including Dean of Students and Dean of Campus Life. Leigh's area of expertise is disability law and the implementation of reasonable accommodations in the classroom and the workplace. Leigh and her husband Jimmy are the proud parents to eight-year-old twins, Ava and Davis. Ava was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at the age of three in 2013. With Ava's diagnosis and the need for accommodations in elementary school, Leigh's work life and home life have merged.



 

Irl B. Hirsch, MD, MACP, is professor and Diabetes Treatment and Teaching Chair at the University of Washington School of Medicine in Seattle. He received his medical degree from the University of Missouri School of Medicine in 1984. He completed residency training in internal medicine at the University of Miami, in Miami, Florida and Mount Sinai Hospital in Miami Beach, Florida and a research fellowship at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. He has authored more than 170 papers, more than 60 editorials, three commentaries for The Journal of the American Medical Association, numerous book chapters and six books for patients and physicians. He is the past editor-in-chief of DOC News and Clinical Diabetes. Currently, he is section editor for Up-To-Date. Areas of interest include glucose variability, i.e. if fluctuations in blood glucose could have an impact on the complications of diabetes due to inflammation and reactive oxygen species which occurs both with hyperglycemic spikes and hypoglycemic troughs. He is currently researching the impact of glucose control on inpatient bone marrow transplant patients who have had no change in mortality over the last 20 years. With the T1D Exchange, he has become involved with the study of older patients with type 1 diabetes, especially with regard to issues pertaining to hypoglycemia. Over the years he has explored the various biomarkers of glucose and the various limitations of hemoglobin A1C. From both a research and teaching point of view, he has spent his career studying best strategies for the use of insulin therapy in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes and recently Dr. Hirsch has become involved with artificial pancreas technology. He has an interest in the use of computers in diabetes data management, how pattern recognition can be used to improve diabetes control and how glycemic variability noted on glucose meter downloads may be an independent risk for microvascular complications. These ideas have led to the funding and completion of the trial FLAT-SUGAR (FLuctuATion reduction with inSUlin Glp-1 Added togetheR). Additional past major clinical research trials include DCCT, ACCORD, STAR-1, the JDRF Sensor Trial, SEARCH, ORIGIN, and ADAG, a variety of important observations with the T1D Exchange and many more involved with insulin therapy. Dr. Hirsch is the former chair of the Professional Practice Committee for the American Diabetes Association and served as a member of the American Board of Internal Medicine.



 

Korey K. Hood, PhD, is Professor of Pediatrics at Stanford University where he directs NIH-funded research projects and provides clinical care aimed at promoting health and quality of life outcomes in youth with diabetes and their families. Dr. Hood actively investigates the human factors associated with the uptake of diabetes technology and works with Dr. Bruce Buckingham on his team's artificial pancreas project. Dr. Hood also serves on national committees for the American Diabetes Association and is on editorial boards for Diabetes Care and the Journal of Pediatric Psychology. Dr. Hood is the author of Type 1 Teens: A Guide to Managing Your Life with Diabetes and a recent book entitled Teens With Diabetes: A Clinician's Guide (with authors Michael Harris, PhD and Jill Weissberg-Benchell, PhD, CDE). His research, clinical care, and service are fueled by his personal experience with type 1 diabetes. He was diagnosed as a young adult and has spent more than 15 years managing type 1 diabetes. He is passionate about helping children and teens with diabetes, and their families, make diabetes a part of their lives while not letting it run their lives.



 

George Huntley is the Chief Operating Officer and Chief Financial Officer of Theoris Group, Inc., a professional services and software company based in Indianapolis, IN with offices throughout the US and Europe. He has been living with type 1 diabetes since 1983 and has been an active volunteer in the fight against diabetes since 1986. George has held many leadership roles with the American Diabetes Association including Chair of the National Board of Directors. George is a founding member and current officer of the National Diabetes Volunteer Leadership Council, a 501c3 organization dedicated to patient advocacy to improve the quality of life for people living with diabetes. George also serves on the board of Children With Diabetes.



 

Dana Lewis was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in 2002 as a freshman in high school and is now most known for building her own DIY “artificial pancreas” (automated insulin delivery system, or hybrid closed loop) and founding the open source artificial pancreas movement. She is working with the OpenAPS community to make safe and effective artificial pancreas technology available (sooner) for people with diabetes around the world. She is now a Principal Investigator (PI) for a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation funded grant project to work to scale patient-led innovation and scientific discovery in more patient communities. Dana is also the author of an illustrated children's book, Carolyn's Robot Relative, to help explain diabetes devices to kids like her nieces and nephews.



 

Howard Look is founder, President and CEO of Tidepool, an open source, not-for-profit effort to make diabetes data more accessible, actionable, and meaningful by liberating data from diabetes devices, supporting researchers, and providing great, free software to the diabetes community. Tidepool is also developing Tidepool Loop, a hybrid closed loop system for iPhone. Previously, Howard was on the founder's team at TiVo where he was VP of Software and User Experience. He was also VP of Software at Pixar, where he led the team developing Pixar's proprietary film-making system, and at Amazon's consumer electronics subsidiary, Lab126. Howard received his BS in Computer Engineering from Carnegie Mellon University. Howard's daughter was diagnosed with T1D at age 11.



 

Leyla Mansour-Cole, Esq., is a lawyer living and working near Washington, D.C as the Community & Policy Manager of the Diabetes Patient Advocacy Coalition (DPAC). She attended American University's Washington College of Law, where she was a lead attorney in the Disability Rights Law Clinic, a managing editor of the Health Law and Policy Brief, and a co-symposium director of the Health Law and Justice Society. She also completed internships with the D.C. Board of Medicine and the Children's Law Center's Healthy Together program. Since graduating, she has worked for the government in a policy position. She was also a national organizer for the March for Health, a protest march in support of the Affordable Care Act, which occurred in Washington, D.C. and fourteen other cities across the country. Leyla has been living with type 1 diabetes since her diagnosis in 1995.



 

Diana M. Naranjo, PhD, is Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford. As a trained pediatric and adult psychologist working in behavioral medicine, Dr. Naranjo focuses on the psychosocial needs of patients and families with diabetes. Together with the team, she aims to understand barriers and facilitators to care, what developmental demands are important as adolescent’s transition to adulthood, and how to best provide services that engage young adults and their families. Furthermore, as a Latino-American and fluent in Spanish, much of her clinical work focuses on bridging the health-care gap for underserved ethnic minority patients with type 1 diabetes.



 

Kristen O'Dell, MS, RD, was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at the age of nine. Managing this untamable disease initiated a career in healthcare for her. She earned her Masters degree in Dietetics at D’Youville College in Buffalo, NY. Kristen’s first CWD conference was in 2011. She fell in love with the people and relationships she formed. In 2015, Kristen became the dietitian for the conferences and has loved it ever since. Between menu planning, carbohydrate counting and allergy accommodations, she is looking forward to tasting all the food, working with the kids, seeing old friends and making many more!



 

R. Stewart Perry grew up in Lexington, Kentucky. Since 1983 he has been the co-owner of Perry & Perry State Farm Insurance, one of the largest State Farm Insurance agencies in the state of Kentucky and is a Diabetes Consultant and Advocate. Stewart’s family has been dramatically affected by diabetes. His son has type 1 diabetes, both parents, and sister have all had diabetes during their lifetime. He has lost an uncle, grandfather and great grandmother to complications of diabetes. Stewart was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in 1990. Since that time, he has been actively involved in the American Diabetes Association. Stewart was the Chairman of the National Board of Directors and Chair of the National Advocacy Committee for five years, He was Chair Bluegrass Chapter for a number of years and helped organize many of the fundraising events still in existence. He served as the Kentucky Affiliate Board of Vice-Chair and was Chair-Elect when it became a part of the Southern Region where he served as the Chair of the Southern Region. He also is a former member of the National Board of Directors. He is the State of Kentucky State Advocacy Chair for ADA. Stewart is a member of the Kentucky Diabetes Network and a founding member of the Fayette County Diabetes Collation. Stewart was appointed by two different Governors of Kentucky to the GET FIT KY Board and The Diabetes Research Trust Fund Board where he currently still serves. Stewart is one of the founders of the National Diabetes Volunteer Leadership Council and currently serves as an officer of that organization. Where he has been instrumental in passing Diabetes Action Plan legislation in 18 states over the past four years. Stewart serves on the board of Children with Diabetes.



 

Gary Scheiner, MS, CDE, is owner and Clinical Director of Integrated Diabetes Services, a practice located just outside of Philadelphia specializing in intensive insulin therapy and advanced education for children and adults. He and his staff provide consultations throughout the world via phone and the internet. Gary is a Masters-level exercise physiologist. He has been a Certified Diabetes Educator for 19 years, and served as the 2014 Diabetes Educator of the Year. He has had type 1 diabetes for 30 years and makes personal use of insulin pump therapy and CGM. Gary has written dozens of articles for diabetes trade publications and six books, including the popular Think Like A Pancreas - A Practical Guide to Managing Diabetes With Insulin. He lectures nationally and internationally for people with diabetes as well as professionals in the healthcare industry. In addition to serving on the faculty of Children With Diabetes and the Board of Directors for JDRF, Gary volunteers for the American Diabetes Association, Diabetes Sisters, and Setebaid Diabetes Camps. Gary has been happily married for 25 years and has four wonderful kids. A fitness fanatic, he enjoys playing basketball, running, cycling and cheering on his Philadelphia sports teams.





  Denotes faculty or staff with diabetes




  Friends for Life® Seattle 2019 Conference  
  Introduction - Registration - Exhibitor Application  
  Program - Youth Program - Faculty - Youth Faculty - CWD Staff  



                 
  Back to Friends for Life Seattle 2019 Return to the Top of This Page

Last Updated: Monday January 07, 2019 19:30:48
This Internet site provides information of a general nature and is designed for educational purposes only. If you have any concerns about your own health or the health of your child, you should always consult with a physician or other health care professional.

This site is published by T-1 Today, Inc. (d/b/a Children with Diabetes), a 501c3 not-for-profit organization, which is responsible for its contents. Our mission is to provide education and support to families living with type 1 diabetes.
By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use, Legal Notice, and Privacy Policy.
© Children with Diabetes, Inc. 1995-2018. Comments and Feedback.