Back to Adults Mie Kaieda

My name is Mie Kaieda. I live in Tokyo, Japan. I was diagnosed as diabetes on May 1992. I am currently 25 years old and have given myself shots 4 times a day and have tested my blood sugar before injections since then. Last year, on June 5, I got married and live with my husband whose occupation is a freelance writer while I am also working at an office near my apartment.

Now, I can keep in good control (current HbA1c is 6.0%!) because of the love my parents, many friends, and my husband give me. I use injections, but I enjoy my life doing what I like!

I of course have to live by a litte bit of a strict diet, make sure I count carbonhydrates to do the appropriate dose of insulin and have to eat at specific times every day. But it is so minor of a hassle for me! To have a good pregnancy, I try hard to keep in good control. For 9 years, I have lived with diabetes whether I like it or not. Today I'd like to tell you about my story when I started the life with diabetes.

When I was a senior in high school, at the age of 17, I suddenly came to get thirsty, feel hungry and get tired. I drank and ate lots, and had to go to the bathroom. At the same time I lost weight drastically. I didn't understand what happenend in my body. So, I asked the school nurse about the changes and was advised to go hospital. Little did I dream I had an incurable disease, so what the doctor said surprised me. "You have Type 1 diabetes." Here in Japan, people have a bad image toward diabetes mellitus. They think that it must be caused by bad manners like drinking and eating too much. As you know, it is very difficult for adolescents with diabetes to accept the reality and themselves.

For a month, I was in the hospital. I had enough, enough time to think of myself. Unfortunately, just before I was diagnosed, I had been broken-hearted. I liked a boy who was a classmate and used to be one of the best friends of mine. I believed that we could share the feeling with each other. It seemed very natural that I fell in love with him. But, when I confessed him, he said to me, "You are just a friend to me. If you were a man, we would be the real best friend". One day I found that he told our other classmates about it and made fun of me by saying, "She isn't pretty, so I can't love her." For him, it might be just kidding. But it hurt me deeply. Those two things - the diagnosis and the lost love - made me very nervous emotionally and physically. "My sickness is not curable and my looks are not good. I don't have any merits. Do I have to live long?" I asked myself day after day even if I got out of the hospital.

On the other hand, I have a lot of good things. I knew how my parents were anxious about me. Seeing me on the bed, my mom told me that she wanted to take my place. At that time, I realized how I was loved. Before going to hospital, I used to be a bad girl for my dad and mom because I was at a rebellious age while I did a good job at school. I was an excellent student, in fact! And I noticed that I had a lot of friends who came to see me in the hospital. They encouraged me. That enabled me to smile again! And I came to understand a little about what it is like to be one who is hurt mentalily and physically. Unless I got this disease, I couldn't find it out. I'm now scared that I lost such feelings. I don't wanna hurt others. Diabetes gives me a lot!

That's my story of starting life with diabetes. If you are more interested in my other diabetes stories, please visit my homepage at Hope you enjoy!

Mie Kaieda

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July 15, 2000
Updated January 9, 2003

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Last Updated: Thursday February 27, 2014 19:28:20
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