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  Back to Diabetes Dictionary Diabetes Dictionary: E

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Edema
A swelling or puffiness of some part of the body such as the ankles. Water or other body fluids collect in the cells and cause the swelling.

Electromyography (EMG) and Nerve Conduction Velocity (NCV) Studies
Tests used to diagnose neuropathy and check for nerve damage. These tests are usually both run at the same time, using the same equipment.

Emergency Medical Identification
Cards, bracelets, or necklaces with a written message used by people with diabetes or other medical problems to alert others in case of a medical emergency such as coma.

See the list of companies that sell Medical Identification Products.

Endocrine pancreas
The part of the pancreas that produces hormones that govern sugar metabolism. Compare with the exocrine pancreas.

Endocrine Glands
Glands that release hormones into the bloodstream. They affect how the body uses food (metabolism). They also influence other body functions. One endocrine gland is the pancreas. It releases insulin so the body can use sugar for energy.

See also: Gland.

Endocrinologist
A doctor who treats people who have problems with their endocrine glands. Diabetes is an endocrine disorder.

See also: Endocrine glands.

Endogenous
Produced or made inside the body; for instance, insulin made by a person's own pancreas is endogenous insulin.

Pronounced: en-DODGE-in-us

Compare: Exogenous

Endogenous Antibodies
In Type 1 diabetes, several different autoantibodies against normal tissues are found. These antibodies are associated with the destruction of the beta cells of the pancreas, although their exact role is uncertain. Some of the autoantibodies which are found in diabetes patients include islet-cell antibodies (ICA's), anti-insulin antibodies (AIA's) and anti-GAD antibodies.

End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD)
The final phase of kidney disease; treated by dialysis or kidney transplantation.

See also: Dialysis; nephropathy.

Enzymes
A special type of protein. Enzymes help the body's chemistry work better and more quickly. Each enzyme usually has its own chemical job to do such as helping to change starch into glucose (sugar).

Epidemiology
The study of a disease that deals with how many people have it, where they are, how many new cases develop, and how to control the disease.

Epinephrine
One of several hormones made in the adrenal glands. It helps the liver release glucose (sugar), and limits the release of insulin from the pancreas.

Epinephrine is responsible for some of the symptoms of hypoglycemia, including anxiety, sweating, tremor, pallor, nausea, and rapid heart beat.

Epinephrine is also called adrenalin. It is available as a prescription medication, for treating severe allergic reactions by antagonizing the effects of histamine and reducing capillary permeability.

Etiology
The study of what causes a disease; also the cause or causes of a certain disease.

Euglycemia
A normal level of glucose (sugar) in the blood.

Compare to hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia.

Exchange Lists
A grouping of foods by type to help people on special diets stay on the diet. Each group lists food in serving sizes. A person can exchange, trade, or substitute a food serving in one group for another food serving in the same group. The lists put foods in six groups:

  1. starch/bread
  2. meat
  3. vegetables
  4. fruit
  5. milk
  6. fats

Within a food group, each serving has about the same amount of carbohydrate, protein, fat, and calories.

Exocrine pancreas
The part of the pancreas that produces enzymes that are needed in intestinal digestion. Compare with the endocrine pancreas.

Exogenous
Produced or made outside the body; for instance, insulin that is commercially produced (made from pork or beef pancreas or by biosynthetic processes) is exogenous insulin when given to people.

Pronounced: ex-SODGE-in-us

Compare: Endogenous

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P R S T U V W X



                 
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Last Updated: Tuesday October 25, 2011 17:15:50
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