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From Bangalore, India:

Now 18 years old, I have not attained my full height. I still haven't developed beard on my face while all my friends of my age are fully matured. In other words, I am physically immature. Is high blood sugar reason for my immaturity? My HbA1c level is 16+. Can I mature after my teenage years?


You have very poorly controlled diabetes mellitus, and you know it. A hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) value of 16% is quite high! The goal for someone your age is under 6.5%.

Your letter indicates that you are followed by a diabetes/endocrinology specialist. In a young man, they should be able to assess your degree of physical pubertal maturation not just by looking at your facial beard, but by assessing your other body hair changes and the appropriate changes that should have occurred with your genital development, including larger testicular size. They can also measure the hormone of puberty to see if they are in line.

But, such poorly controlled diabetes as you describe is WELL KNOWN to be associated with poor progression through puberty! It can also be associated with short stature and enlargement to your liver. This has been called the "Mauriac Syndrome." Please talk with your diabetes team and get your sugars in better control. It takes a will and only you can be the spark to do it!


Original posting 27 Jun 2012
Posted to A1c, Glycohemoglobin, HgbA1c and Other


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Last Updated: Wednesday June 27, 2012 13:13:14
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