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October 30, 2000

Social Issues: School and Daycare

Question from Sunny Isles Beach, Florida, USA:

I am the mother of an almost seven year old girl, diagnosed this summer. I recently read on the ADA website, and from the Orlando Sentinel, about the push to have school personnel trained to administer glucagon injections. Why fight for this? It seems much better to fight for full time school nurses. We were able to do a 504 plan for our daughter and have a nurse on campus, for this year at least. I don't want teachers to dread having my daughter in class because of her diabetes. I want them to teach her, and let a nurse on campus handle any medical emergencies that may happen. Of course, her teachers are trained in symptoms of high or low blood sugar, etc., but I don't want them to have to administer glucagon. My husband is afraid to do that, and this is his own child! Any thoughts?

Answer:

I agree with your sentiments completely. However, it is important to understand that this is an issue for some parents. Some schools don’t have (and have no intention of getting) a nurse. These parents are fearful that their child will have a severe reaction, requiring glucagon. If no one is able to administer it, they are afraid of potential life-threatening complications.

It is important that we understand all viewpoints. By presenting all of the information, parents and individual school systems can hopefully act in the best interests of children with diabetes.

SS