Lg Cwd
icon-nav-help
Need Help

Submit your question to our team of health care professionals.

icon-nav-current-questions
Current Question

See what's on the mind of the community right now.

icon-conf-speakers-at-a-glance
Meet the Team

Learn more about our world-renowned team.

icon-nav-archives
DTeam Archives

Review the entire archive according to the date it was posted.

icon-question-mark
October 28, 1999

Honeymoon

Question from Tulsa, Oklahoma, USA:

My 13 year old daughter has been in the honeymoon period for 5 months. Will taking anti-inflammatory medicine such as aspirin or ibuprofen slow down the damage to her islet cells?

Answer:

The anti-inflammatory effect of drugs such as “NSAIDs” (non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs; aspirin and ibuprofen both belong to this group) could only slow down a very little the chronic damage to beta cells, probably because it is a long lasting autoimmune attack to the beta cells mediated by T-lymphocytes which counts most towards the destruction of those cells. During the time of the honeymoon period, more than 90% of these beta cells are already destroyed, and it is only tight metabolic control of the blood sugar level which can prolong the life of those still alive.

MS