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May 6, 2001

Daily Care

Question from Austin, Texas, USA:

My seven year old son is working on his fourth year of living with diabetes, and while I know that other parents make insulin adjustments in the summer, I thought it was because of increased activity. This year, as soon as the warm weather hit, I found it necessary to cut back on the insulin. His activity level has not increased -- he is still in school. I now remember that I had to do the same thing last year. Does the body use insulin differently (more efficiently) when the outside temperature increases?

Answer:

I think it is as simple as the bears coming out of hibernation. Children get more active in the Spring. They are fighting school, ready to play and enjoy the weather. Children play harder when they do and look for ways to run. School is a side issue in the Spring — just ask any teacher.

LD