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February 23, 2008

Alternative Therapies and Explanations, Pills for Diabetes

Question from Willamina, Oregon, USA:

There have been several products advertised claiming to reverse diabetes in type 1 and type 2 cases. I don't believe these claims are true however, when my son has a severe episode I'm tempted to try anything. One of the recent products I've seen is called Diamaxol. Please let me know the true story behind these types of products.

Answer:

Going on-line, there are quite a few hits regarding this supplement. The FDA says that it is not a medication. It contains cinnamon, yarrow, and other herbs. The manufacturers of supplements try to market their products as having additional health promoting abilities and they get into trouble. If the FDA classifies a substance as a supplement, there is generally not a lot of clinical testing of the product in people to substantiate claims. If the FDA classifies a product as a drug, it is mandatory that the producer rigorously test the substance in humans and that benefits are substantiated in clinical trials. The bottom line is that I am generally weary of claims about treatment of disease, unless there are scientific studies to back it up. This standard is much more rigorous than testimonials where people claim the product worked for them.

JTL